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banana4monkey

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I’ve been disassembling the Diablo Rouge for the past few nights. This has been an easy task since this is a pretty simple machine. Everything seems to be breaking loose which is great. A few disassembly tips I’ve learned over the years:

 It is important to take good notes, pictures, and use baggies/item tags during disassembly in order to save time when you reassemble. If a lot of time passes from disassembly to reassembly the pictures are a great reference. I also take notes as to the disassembly sequence. It’s good to note if one item needs be taken off before another one can be accessed. I like to use item tags with string and write details that allow me to know what the part is (if it is not obvious), where it is installed, and other useful reference information.

I will be painting many of the parts on this sled. The colors are simple - just red, black, and white are used. Before I start cleaning the parts I will separate the parts into the different colors. Even though I might prime them the same color I will keep them separated. This helps to make sure that I don’t have to remember what color the part needs to be after all the parts are primed the same color. I have been caught a couple different times painting parts the wrong color or forgetting to paint parts after the paint gun was cleaned.   

IMG_3803[1].JPG 
IMG_3804[1].JPG 


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banana4monkey

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It was just another night in the shop last night. Working on the Diablo Rouge  in a warm shop with some good tunes playing sippin on some booze and iced tea while the snow is falling outside. Life is good. I am excited about the snow. I can do a little test and tune on the 600RR on the motocross track after work. Well back to the Diablo. I have been continuing on with the dis assembly removing the boogie wheel assemblies. I discovered some cracked welds on the boogie wheel assemblies, some torn sheet metal on the tractor body, and some sheet metal on the body that needed some straightening. I straightened the sheet metal and then moved on to the torn sheet metal on the tractor body. This is one of the mounts for the exhaust. I cleaned and welded this area and then it was getting late so I was done for the night. It was a simple fix but expect to find and budget time for small repairs like this during restorations. I’ll fix the cracked weld on the boogie wheel assemblies tomorrow.

IMG_3821.JPG  IMG_3824.JPG  IMG_3822.JPG  IMG_3823.JPG 

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banana4monkey

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Didn’t get all that much done on the Diablo since we got about a foot of snow. I came right home from work and hopped on my Polaris sled and did a little test and tune. After the fun was over I worked on fixing the cracked welds on the front boogie wheel assemblies. I ground the cracked welds down with a die grinder and carbide bit. Then a mediablasted the area to clean it for welding. This is a good way to clean a tight area. After blasting I MIG welded all the way around the assembly. I’m planning on getting all the parts cleaned and blasted by the end of the weekend.


IMG_3830.JPG  IMG_3832.JPG  IMG_3834.JPG 

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banana4monkey

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Spent most of the night standing in front of the parts washer cleaning parts and separating parts while listening to car connection which is kind of like a Canadian version of Car Talk. This is a boring part of the restoration for me but it should go by quick. Next step is media blasting all the parts and then prime and paint. The piles are separated per color. Since they will all look the same after priming it is good to separate them so they get painted the correct color.

IMG_3849.JPG 
Boogie wheel assemblies in the parts washer

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banana4monkey

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I was plugging away on the disassembly of the Diablo again last night. I was taking the motor mount plates off and two bolts broke. This slowed me right down. The one bolt stuck out enough that I could get some voice grips on it –that didn’t work. I then slotted it with a hacksaw and used and impact driver – again no dice. I ended drilling both bolts out until I could use a chisel and break out the thin threads that are left. After that I cleaned up the threads with a thread restorer. All is good and I can keep on movin on. Again when you are working on old vehicles you have to expect these issues and take them in stride! The thread restorer is a great tool to use when you don’t really need a tap. I will do a review on them soon.


IMG_3854.JPG  IMG_3858.JPG  IMG_3860.JPG  IMG_3869.JPG  IMG_3867.JPG  IMG_3866.JPG 

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MR. X

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Reply with quote  #6 
Have you seen the bolt organizers they sell at harbour freight? They are cheap enough to keep a couple on hand to dedicate to each project , i have one that stays empty and only gets used for the current project , works great.

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jpeg harbour_freight_bins.jpg (220.70 KB, 4 views)


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banana4monkey

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Yeah that is a good idea. When I bought the house there were some wooden shelves that have multiple compartments that I use to stay organized. It's not fun spending time tracking down parts you took off months ago. In the past couple of years I have used item tags with string on parts to write descriptions and other information that I may forget. It takes a little more effort but really pays off if you have to leave a project idle for an extended period of time. The tags are really cheap to get.

item tag.jpg 

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