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banana4monkey

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On disassembly I found some cracks in the plastic dashboard of the Diablo Rouge. Upon further inspection I determined the crack could be fixed by plastic welding. I have done this method in the past with ATV and dirt bike fenders with success. The plastic welder is made by the urethane supply company. It consists of a heating element and some plastic filler rods. Here is the method I used:

1.       Plug in the iron

2.       Clean the repair area with wax and grease remover and let dry completely.

3.       Clamp the dash to restore correct alignment

4.       With the iron hot groove the plastic the entire length of the crack.

5.       Fill in the groove with the iron and filler rod.

 

For this repair I just did the backside and it seems to be strong enough. I didn’t like the way this repair looked when completed and I didn’t want it to show on the front side. Leaving the front side alone will look better.  If this was an ATV or dirt bike fender I would do both sides since they flex more. I have had mixed results as to the look of the repairs. Some blend in very well and some don’t look so good. It could be the old age of the dash or a different plastic than the filler rod. The box advises that different material filler rods are available but I have not tried them.  I have tried other methods of plastic repair like glues and drilling and stitching and have found that the plastic welding method is stronger and looks better than these methods. The repair turned out well – it is strong, looks better than before, and new cracks in the same area will be avoided. I can get a replacement dash for this sled but it is expensive so the repair route was an easy choice. Just another day in the shop.

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banana4monkey

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The plastic nose piece of the diablo rouge had several cracks and some missing pieces. I plastic welded the cracks and for the missing pieces I did the following:

Plastic welded what I could to retain the shape. In this case I had to use vise grips to hold the form.

Next I needed a donor for the missing plastic. I found an old ski-doo toolbox that would work fine.

I used cardboard to make a template of the missing piece. I then cut out the piece from the toolbox.

I used duct tape to hold the piece in to plastic weld it. I used the process twice to get close to the form of the missing pieces. I ran out of time today and will describe how to finish the repair later this week. Right now the repair looks rough but it should turn out good.





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banana4monkey

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I used some U-POL Dolphin Glaze self leveling glazing putty to blend the surface of the nose piece. I just put on the putty with a spreader let it dry and then sand it down with 180 grit to level and blend. I used some 3M powdered guide coat to help me level the surfaces. It is just a graphite powder that is spread on the filler. As you sand the filler the low spots will show the darker powdered shade.  Once the filler is shaped  I painted the nose black.  This is just a cosmetic piece that will not see a load that will bend and crack the putty so that is why I used it. If the nose piece was going to flex during operation then I would have not used the putty. A new nose piece was $78.00 so this was a good economical fix.

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